THE GRAND ABUJA RALLY

Fully conscious that more than a billion people – or approximately 15 per cent of the world’s population – are estimated to live with some form of disability, with higher prevalence in low-income countries.

This means that disabled people comprise one of the largest single groups of excluded and chronically poor people in the developing world. These and other constraints occasioned by this exclusion made it necessary for the African Youth Movement (AYM)- an NGO in Special Consultative status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as well as the Department of Public Information (DPI) of the United Nations to partner with relevant stakeholders including the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR), the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and other civil society and academia actors to hold the Grand Abuja Rally across the Federal Capital Territory to mark the 2013 IDDR.

Activites at African Youth Movement

Listed below is a partial list of activities we have carried out at the African Youth Movement

1. Public education and awareness campaigns on the environment.

2. School debate to mark the world water day.

3. Be-in-college drive.

4. Campaign against drug abuse and secret cults

5. Stockholm junior water prize competition

6. Millenium Development Goals (MDG) campaign

7.Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and conflict resolution forum

8. Leadership and Youth enhancement project

9. Summit on Civic Responsibility and International Governance

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THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS (MDGs) CAMPAIGN

Whereas, 189 Heads of State and Government in September 2000 at the Millennium Summit in New York, firmly committed to work together to build a safer, more prosperous and equitable world for all by 2015 and adopted eight millennium development goals, MDGs that put a people-centered development at the heart of global, national and local agendas;
Whereas these goals committed rich and poor countries to:
• Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
• Achieve universal primary education
• Promote gender equality and empower women
• Reduce child mortality
• Improve maternal health
• Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
• Ensure environmental sustainability
• Develop a global partnership for development
all by the year 2015

Our Program

REPORT OF THE GRAND ABUJA RALLY TO MARK THE 2013 INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR DISASTER REDUCTION (IDDR) HELD BY THE AFRICAN YOUTH MOVEMENT (AYM) AND HER PARTNERS ON 23 OCTOBER 2013

Whereas:
 More than a billion people – or approximately 15 per cent of the world’s population – are estimated to live with some form of disability, with higher prevalence in low-income countries.
 In 2012, flood disasters in Nigeria displaced 2.3Million people, killed over 363 persons, destroyed about 597, 476 houses and left economic losses in billions of dollars (NEMA)
 In the last twenty years natural disasters have affected 64% of the world’s population (UNISDR)
 Economic losses associated with disasters continue to grow each year in all regions (EM-DAT)
 95% of people killed by disasters are from developing countries (IPCC)
 Women, children and the elderly disproportionally suffer the greatest disaster losses (UNISDR)
 More than 50% of people affected by ‘natural disasters’ live in fragile and conflict-affected countries (Safer World)
 Conflict, insecurity and fragility affect one in four people on the planet (World Bank)
 The majority of disaster losses are due to small-scale recurrent disasters, primarily associated with weather-related hazards (UNISDR/GNDR VFL)
 There is a continuing gap between national DRR policies and local-level practices (GNDR VFL 2009/2011/2013)
The United Nations has designated 13th October each year to mark the International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) to illustrate how people and communities are building resilience and raising awareness about disaster risk reduction with their livelihoods. This year IDDR has the theme ‘LIVING WITH DISABILITY & DISASTERS- A not so obvious conversation!’
Fully conscious that more than a billion people – or approximately 15 per cent of the world’s population – are estimated to live with some form of disability, with higher prevalence in low-income countries.
This means that disabled people comprise one of the largest single groups of excluded and chronically poor people in the developing world. These and other constraints occasioned by this exclusion made it necessary for the African Youth Movement (AYM)- an NGO in Special Consultative status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) as well as the Department of Public Information (DPI) of the United Nations to partner with relevant stakeholders including the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR), the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and other civil society and academia actors to hold the Grand Abuja Rally across the Federal Capital Territory to mark the 2013 IDDR.
The African Youth Movement supports current civil society efforts on the post 2015 development goals discussions including the Post 2015 HFA dialogue anchored by the Global Network for Disaster Reduction (GNDR).
We endorse the Views from the Frontline (VFL) 2013 recommendations for a post-2015 disaster risk reduction framework to strengthen the resilience of communities to all hazards thus:
1. Address the underlying causes of people’s vulnerability to disaster
The UN-ISDR Global Assessment Report itself has revealed that of the HFA’s Priorities for Action, the slowest progress has been made on reducing underlying risk factors. The successor framework needs to address this by strengthening local governance and recognising the role of communities and civil society in supporting effective social change processes to eradicate poverty and exclusion. Besides addressing the dynamic changes, such as
urbanisation, that increase vulnerability, the framework must also respond to the role that structural inequalities, patriarchy and power imbalances between social groups play in creating vulnerability.
2. Recognise the impact of everyday disasters on lives, livelihoods and assets
Cumulatively more losses result from recurrent, everyday disasters than from the large-scale disasters recorded in national loss databases. To reduce such losses it is essential that the global DRR framework incorporates a strong focus on these small scale natural and human derived disasters. A holistic framework needs to reflect the multi-dimensional inter-dependent nature of risks that impact on vulnerable people’s lives and livelihoods.
3. Prioritise the most at risk, poorest and marginalised people
It is the poorest communities in developing countries that have reported the highest growth in disaster losses since 2005 (Views from the Frontline, GNDR, 2013). The HFA2 needs to promote DRR policy strategies that respond to the differential vulnerabilities amongst countries and social groups, and between genders. It must also recognise the role that high-risk vulnerable groups play in achieving effective local risk governance.
In the words of Margareta Wahlstrom, SRSG DRR- ‘What our experiences have shown us is that the presence of disability amplifies the impact of the disaster on a person’s life and reduces the range of strategies to cope with them.’
Let’s join hands to put Disability on the radar of development goals.
We leave you with Scenes from the Rally:
President, AYM sensitizes Young Stakeholders during the Rally.

 

Stakeholders in their IDDR Uniform sing the Disability Anthem